Nevada School Performance Framework Marks Starting Line on Path to Becoming the Fastest Improving State in the Nation

Immediate Release


Contact

Greg Bortolin
775.687.9201
Carson City, NV - December 14, 2017

After three years of stakeholder engagement work the Nevada Department of Education (NDE) will unveil its updated Nevada School Performance Framework (NSPF) at 4 p.m. today, revealing anticipated star ratings of elementary and middle schools throughout the state. The updated NSPF supports the Department’s work to ensure that every student, in every classroom, has every opportunity to succeed.

“The updated NSPF reflects the starting line on our path to becoming the fastest improving state in the nation while taking a holistic approach to measuring school performance against high expectations,” said Steve Canavero, Ph.D., Superintendent of Public Instruction. “The NSPF provides actionable information for the continuous improvement of our education system.”

The anticipated star ratings can be found at NevadaReportCard.com beginning at 4 p.m.

The new NSPF is built on different criteria from its previous release in 2014, realigning expectations to a national bar with more rigorous requirements. The new NSPF has a renewed emphasis on student growth, a commitment to students from all backgrounds succeeding and added measures of English language proficiency and school climate.

The star ratings were originally set to be released in September, however, at the request of school districts across the state for a phased implementation, today’s release of information is another step in explaining the updated NSPF across the state so that principals, teachers, and parents can put it to use for continuous improvement. High schools will earn only an index score and not receive a star rating until September of 2018 while the Department works with stakeholders to create the College and Career Ready Diploma and transitions the End of Course exams to common, district administered final exams.

In partnership with Districts and other stakeholder groups, the phased implementation of the updated NSPF provided numerous opportunities for meaningful engagement and has aided in the understanding of the transition from the old 2014 NSPF to the new 2017 NSPF.

The federal Every Student Succeeds Act gave the NDE the opportunity to convene stakeholder workgroups to generate accountability recommendations that would ultimately shape the NSPF. The ESSA Accountability Work Group proposed recommendations for an updated NSPF that would comply with ESSA and include school quality elements aligned to stakeholder values: a holistic approach to school accountability, continuous improvement in order to prepare all students for success after high school. Those recommendations were approved by the ESSA Advisory Group and the State Board of Education. The approved recommendations were included in Nevada’s ESSA plan which was submitted to the US Department of Education and approved in August of this year.

Under ESSA, states are tasked with the responsibility to create or revise their current accountability systems to ensure that states “meaningfully differentiate” schools based on:

• Academic Proficiency on State assessments
• Graduation rates for high school
• English Language Proficiency
• Growth or other statewide academic indicator for k-8 schools
• At least one other State set indicator of school quality or student success
• 95 percent assessment participation rate

The NSPF provides clear and concise information about how a school is performing on a scale from one star (not meeting standards) to five stars (superior). Developed by stakeholders, new policy descriptors for each star level emphasize equity and guide performance expectations. The new star ratings are built around the foundational three-star performance expectations where a three-star school must have all students meeting the state’s 2017 measures of interim progress or have high student growth. Points were assigned to measures so that approximately half of the total points possible are earned one of two ways: meeting the state’s 2017 measures of interim progress or by achieving at the 50th percentile of schools from the 2016-2017 school year. Maximum points are earned by meeting the 2022 long-term goals or by achieving at the 85th percentile of schools from the 2016-2017 school year.

The Elementary School cut scores are:

• One-star schools have an index score of zero to less than 27 (49 schools)
• Two-star schools have an index score of greater than 27 and less than 50 (113 schools)
• Three-star schools have an index score of greater than 50 and less than 67 (84 schools)
• Four-star schools have an index score of greater than 67 and less than 84 (72 schools)
• Five-star schools have an index score of greater than 84 and less than 102 (48 schools)

The Middle School cut scores are:

• One-star schools have an index score of zero and less than 29 (20 schools)
• Two-star schools have an index score of greater than 29 and less than 50 (43 schools)
• Three-star schools have an index score of greater than 50 and less than 70 (38 schools)
• Four-star schools have an index score of greater than 70 and less than 80 (17 schools)
• Five-star schools have an index score of greater than 80 and less than 102 (22 schools)

Before high school star ratings are issued, NDE needs to balance two demands: compliance with federal law and the additional time needed to build out the College and Career Ready (CCR) index in a manner consistent with the new opportunities available to students under Assembly Bill 7 and the College and Career Ready Diploma pathways. The Department will remain compliant with the federal law by using a whole school index score but will need more time to fully develop the CCR index before issuing a Star rating.